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James Leavitt

 

Math & Sciences Teacher

 

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ZOOLOGY SYLLABUS

Description: Zoology is a semester-long course that takes the overview provided by the year-long Biology course and goes in depth into the 9 phyla of the Animal Kingdom.  Particular areas of interest are adaptation, natural selection and selective breeding, theories of human origins, and biomimetic robots. 

INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS: 

At the end of this course, you will 

COURSE SCHEDULE

Daily Schedule:

In-class days:

  10 minutes: entrance ticket to review concepts learned 

35 minutes: Projects and activities tied to learning concept

5 minutes: End of period check in, exit ticket and clean up

Calendar of Topics

For each unit, students will learn the major physical traits that identify each of the 9 phyla.  Students will learn about adaptation, natural selection, and selective breeding in regards to evolution.  They will learn current theories in human development.  Students will research the use of animal traits in the design of robots.

Unit 1: invertebrates 

Unit 2: sponges

Unit 3: worms

Unit 4: mollusks

Unit 5: arachnids

Unit 6: insects

Unit 7: vertebrates

Unit 8: fish

Unit 9: birds

Unit 10: mammals

Unit 11: humans

Unit 12: robots

 

MATH DESIGN SYLLABUS

Description: Students may take this semester-long class as an elective math credit or as an art credit and will experience the unique relationship between the two subjects. The class will be completely driven by hands-on artistic projects in which students will be actively learning and practicing practical math techniques.  The course will help students improve their number sense and geometric comprehension. Students will explore properties of number sense, operations, and repetition.  They will develop an understanding of the area, perimeter, surface area, or volume of objects. They will use similarity or congruence, along with creating translations and transformations, in creating designs.  Students will manipulate information using the Pythagorean Theorem to create similar triangles.  The students will hone their spatial thinking through discovery of fractals in nature.

INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS: 

At the end of this course, you will 

COURSE SCHEDULE

Daily Schedule:

In-class days:

  10 minutes: Discussion of concepts learned

Real world connections to concepts through entrance activity

35 minutes: Projects and activities tied to concepts

5 minutes: End of period check in, exit ticket and clean up

Calendar of Topics

Unit 1: Symmetry - Kaleidoscope 

Unit 2: Parabolic Curves - colored pencil compass art, original designs

Unit 3: Parabolic Curves - string wall art

Unit 4: Intro to Perspective Drawing - colored pencil interior room

Unit 5: To Scale Drawing intro

Unit 6: Scale modelling - floor plans

Unit 7: Scale modelling - 3D models

Unit 8: Platonic Solids and origami mobiles and chains

Unit 9: Blow up an image - graphing transfer from photo

Unit 10: Cross stitch graph paper pattern

Unit 11: Optical Illusion Painted black and white ceiling tiles

Unit 12: Fibonacci Art

Unit 13: Spirolateral Art

Unit 14: Pi Skyline, Protractor Art

 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS: Taught primarily through hands-on projects that are relevant to students’ lives, Physical Science is a year long course using experiential and project-based learning to present concepts of matter, force, energy and waves.  Students will use the scientific method to complete daily activity or produce a multistep project.  

At the end of this course, you will 

steps of the scientific method

reason scientifically

concepts of matter, force, energy and waves

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

Unit 1:  August - October Matter and Mass

Unit 2:  November- January Forces and Machines

Unit 3:  January - March Energy and Magnetism

Unit 4:  March - June Waves and Motion

 

RECREATIONAL MATH SYLLABUS

Description: Recreational Math is a semester-long course that teaches the mathematics behind games and puzzles.  The term recreational math implies entertainment, and an important aspect of it involves informal study of math concepts through studying the play of games. Students will study the systems involved in games, competitive versus cooperative games, and best practices in problem-solving. 

Knowledge and Skills

At the end of this course, you will

Study the structure of games through play

Report their game-play experience in reports

Learn how playability and balance factor into game design

Incorporate art into games and puzzle designs 

Research problem-solving concepts when presented a puzzle

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

Daily Schedule:

In-class days:

  10 minutes: Discussion of concepts learned

Real world connections to concepts through entrance activity

35 minutes: Projects and activities tied to concepts

5 minutes: End of period check in, exit ticket and clean up

 

 

Calendar of Topics

Unit 1:  playing games 

Unit 2:  games of luck versus skill

Unit 3:  probability and balanced play

Unit 4:  competitive versus cooperative play

Unit 5:  systems behind designing a game

Unit 6:  building a game of your own

Unit 7:  puzzles

Unit 8:  math puzzles

Unit 9:  word puzzles

Unit 10:  logic puzzles

Unit 11:  Rebus and word scrambles

Unit 12:  cryptograms

Unit 13:  visual puzzles

Unit 14:  mazes

Unit 15:  building puzzles of your own

 

ALGEBRA 1 SYLLABUS

INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS:  The sixth period of every school day a 50 minute class in Algebra 1 is offered by Mr. Leavitt. The course is experiential and project-based, providing students with an environment to discover the major concepts of Algebra through activities.  Topics covered will be the usefulness of variables, creating functions, finding solutions using tables and graphs, and following patterns.

Students in Algebra 1 will maintain a digital journal with daily entrance and exit ticket questions, along with documenting the daily activity.  Projects will be on-going and linked to daily activity concepts.  Students will be responsible for their journal entries, participation in activities, and completion of projects.

At the end of this course, you will

COURSE SCHEDULE

DAILY SCHEDULE

Complete warm up activity to review previous learning

Participation in chunked learning activities of new concept

Real world connections to concept

Projects or activities tied to concept

End of period check in, exit ticket and clean up

 

CALENDAR OF TOPICS

Unit 1:  August - October Quantities and Relations

variables, properties, exponents, solving equations and inequalities

Unit 2:  November- January Tables and Graphs

2 variable equations, slope, change over time, tables, coordinate graphing

Unit 3:  January-March Functions and Formula

functions, mixtures, formula, quadratics, parametrics

Unit 4:  March-June Patterns

arithmetic sequence, geometric sequence, matrices, fractals

 

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR ALL CLASSES

General Rules:

 

Grading Policies:

When students are absent, they are expected to make up all work they missed within 5 class days of their return to school.  After 5 days, acceptance of late work is at the discretion of the teacher.

 

Grading Scale: 

A+

97 - 100

B+

87 - 89.9

C+

77 – 79.9

D+

67 – 69.9

F

0 – 59.9

A

93 - 96.9

B

83 – 86.9

C

73 – 76.9

D

63 – 66.9

 

 

A-

90 - 92.9

B-

80 – 82.9

C-

70 – 72.9

D-

60 – 62.9

 

 



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